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Welcome to Cemetech! Since 2000, Cemetech (pronounced KE'me'tek) has been teaching programming and electronics and developing software and hardware. Among Cemetech's specialties are TI, HP, and Casio graphing calculators like the TI-84 Plus, TI-Nspire, HP Prime, and Casio Prizm, embedded and DIY electronics, and computer and web programming. Cemetech provides a safe, friendly space for people to learn, show off projects, and share knowledge and expertise. Our staff of friendly volunteers hang out on our forum and IRC and SAX chatrooms, and are happy to help.
TI Teases New TI-84 Plus CE Colors: Gold, ???
Published by KermMartian on April 19, 2016 at 6:23:48 PM CST | Discuss this article (22)

TI Education has posted the teaser image below on its Facebook page, asking visitors to guess the new colors of the TI-84 Plus CE to be released in time for Back to School 2016. As you may know (and the image below certainly reinforces), the TI-84 Plus CE currently is manufactured in seven colors: red, denim, plum, denim, lightning (light blue), silver, pink, and black.



Now, TI is teasing the addition of two new colors, one of which is gold, and the other of which may (or may not) be white, thanks to a tip from our French friends. At T^3 2016, we got to see the gold TI-84 Plus CE below, which was at the time the first of its kind in general circulation. What do you think of the gold, and do you think white will be the other new color? Do you, like us, wish that there was also a translucent TI-84 Plus CE, a la the TI-83 Plus Silver Edition of yore? Are there any other TI-84 Plus CE colors you'd like to see (or current colors you think should be removed)? Let us know in the attached thread.



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TI-84 Plus CE Minesweeper Released
Published by KermMartian on April 8, 2016 at 2:44:16 PM CST | Discuss this article (24)

On a roll after porting Conway's Game of Life from the Casio Prizm to the TI-84 Plus CE, Shaun "Merthsoft" McFall has now released Minesweeper for the TI-84 Plus CE as well. A port of his Minesweeper for the Casio Prizm, written in C, it provides all of the Minesweeper fun and frustration you've come to expect from the game. Move a cursor around the screen to click on squares and reveal what's underneath - but click on a mine, and the game is over. You can flag squares as suspected mines, just like in the PC version, and the game will also tell you how many mines are left to find. Like his Game of Life, Merth's Minesweeper is open source; the code should provide a good learning tool for others looking to port their Prizm games to the TI-84 Plus CE. Congratulations to Merth on another great TI-84 Plus CE program, and if you have any feedback or comments, please post them in the attached topic for him.

Download
Minesweeper for the TI-84 Plus CE

Minesweeper for the TI-84 Plus CE

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GPU Technology Conference 2016
Published by comicIDIOT on April 5, 2016 at 7:21:25 PM CST | Discuss this article (9)

In January, I attended CES 2016, and this month, I had the opportunity to go to the GPU Technology Conference 2016. GTC was notably smaller and less populated than CES, but I expected as much despite GTC attendance doubling since 2012. By 2pm the exhibition floor was not nearly as crowded as it was at 11a after the keynote. Thankfully, unlike CES16 I was able to try an Oculus Rift in 45 minutes. Unlike PSVR at CES I did get a little sense of motion sickness. Now, I'm not one to get motion sickness but I attribute this case to the fact that I was turning my head and piloting the space ship all while planted in a chair. I also found an open-source tool to generate neural network images, plus another website that does this stuff: http://deepart.io.

This brings me into the keynote. I wouldn't have a lot to write about if I didn't get into the keynote. I had a seat right up front behind the rows of press. It started a few minutes after 9am but while we waited there was a great screen saver of sorts on the stage screen. Once underway Jen-Hsun, the CEO and co-Founder of NVIDIA, mentioned the 5 areas he'd be speaking on today: The NVIDIA SDK, Tesla P100, Iray VR, Autonomous Cars plus HD Mapping and, the DGX-1. I didn't take notes during this whole thing and decided to take photos on my phone pretty late through the keynote so I'll only touch on the stuff I remember.

Continue to full article >>

2016 looks to be a great year!

GPU Technology Conference 2016

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Doors CS 7 Source Code Released
Published by KermMartian on April 1, 2016 at 12:26:15 PM CST | Discuss this article (17)

In September 2001, "Doors XP" was first created for the TI-83 graphing calculator as a trivially-simple TI-BASIC program. It contained a hard-coded menu of the programs on my calculator, allowing me to run any of them by choosing them from the list. Over the fourteen and a half years since that first experiment, Doors XP transformed into Doors CS 7, an App shell for the TI-83 Plus, TI-83 Plus Silver Edition, TI-84 Plus, and TI-84 Plus Silver Edition (and their confusingly-named French counterparts, the TI-82 Advanced, TI-83 Plus.fr, and TI-84 Plus Pocket.fr). To quote a previous Cemetech news article, Doors CS has engendered accolades, criticism, and controversy, and Doors CS and its features have been featured on ticalc.org, Hackaday, Gizmodo, and others. It was first upgraded from a pure TI-BASIC program to a TI-BASIC program with a custom ASM program used to list and run programs. Then, it because a fully-assembly program, and soon after that, an App stored in and run from Archive. Over the years, new features were added, including libraries for TI-BASIC and assembly programmers, Shell Expansions (SEs), Associated Programs (APs) that open files in associated viewers, a GUI API for programmers to use, the CALCnet 2.2 networking system, and more. Throughout its life, Doors CS 7 has remained a GUI- and mouse-based shell, where you move a mouse cursor and click to interact with the shell. On feedback from users, a Shell Expansion called TabFuncs was first created, then integrated into the shell, allowing programs to be selected with the arrow keys instead of a mouse cursor if desired.

In July 2013, I released Doors CS 7.2, bringing bug fixes to the shell but announcing that no further Doors CS 7 versions would be released, and effectively bringing support to an end-of-life state. As I said then:
I want to especially thank all of you in the community, from the Cemetech administrators who helped me stay motivated on Doors CS, to the beta-testers and coders who contributed their time and effort. I even want to thank the seasoned community members who scoffed at some young upstart boasting about his as-yet nonexistent shell so many years ago, whose skepticism pushed Doors CS from two marble notebook full of half-working assembly code into the rock-solid, widely-used software that it is today. I look forward to the next decade-long project that I'll find myself embroiled in.


Now, I want to add one final epilogue to this story. For a long time, Doors CS had been open-source, with the source code available to anyone who wanted to read it and learn. An unfortunate incident drove me to close its source, but now, I'm happy to re-open the source code for posterity. Anyone looking to learn about TI-83 Plus/TI-84 Plus shells, GUIs, networking, and graphics routines are invited to check out the source code on GitHub. The source has been released under a custom license that acknowledges the fact that some Doors CS 7 code is used in the still closed-source Doors CSE 8 and Doors CE 9, but I intend to allow as much re-use of the code in others' projects as possible, as long as you ask nicely first. Please enjoy, and I'll even accept pull requests and consider releasing new versions if people find bugs to fix and optimizations to make. I'd like to that CVSoft, geekboy1011, Iambian, and tr1p1ea for discussing this move with me and giving me their blessings to release their contributions. Enjoy!

Download
Doors CS 7 binary release
Doors CS 7 source code



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