~dusts off cemetech account~

Long time no see!!!

I am in college now, and also programming more, so I should be around more often. For now, i can get a bunch of FREE software through the college. and I would like some comparisons

Should I go with Windows 7? or Windows 8. I can get both, but my primary pc will get the better one.

I got microsoft visual studieo 2012 and 2010, is there any difference? which is better?

I also have a box, i am thinking about turning into a file server (Have been for awhile), but got a new(old) one that has built in hdd raid. Which Microsoft server would be best? Name any of them, i can get them.

Think that is all for now.
From what I've seen of Windows 8 so far, it will be very frustrating for those of us used to Windows 7, so I'd suggest Windows 7. I don't know too much about the differences between VS 2010 and 2012, but presumably the latter has more features and fewer bugs, so I see no reason not to go with it. If you want to make a file server, you're better off with any Linux than Windows Server.
Hmm, ok, I am going to download ALL the software anyway, since its free. Might be useful at some point, (or not) its still like 5000 dollars of free downloads.

Download
save
??? (What the hell do I do with it all)
Profit.Very Happy
VS 2012 already has the Metro style IIRC. If you don't like it, go with VS 2010 Wink

Windows 8 seems to be better than 7 both in terms of stability and resource usage (at least that's my conclusion after trying the development releases of 8 - and I'm an avid Linux user). But the UI dramatically changes, and even though there are tools to skip the Metro Start menu and bring the button back to its place, there are still many things changed to fit with the Metro UI.

If I were in your situation I'd do the same: download everything since you get everything for free (assuming you have a great connection speed).
its an iffy connection speed, but I have loads of time in classes, so no hurry..

As for win 8, if I dont have a good pc. (2GB ram, 4GB of ram) Would I be better with Windows 8 then?
Aes_Sedia5 wrote:
its an iffy connection speed, but I have loads of time in classes, so no hurry..

As for win 8, if I dont have a good pc. (2GB ram, 4GB of ram) Would I be better with Windows 8 then?


(/me wonders when 2GB ram became substandard)

You'd be better off with win8, if you decide to use it. In my experience, many linux distros can be highly lightweight, especially if you choose what packages you need, and use lxde or xfce (They run on as little as 45 MB and 32 MB, respectively; though you can't run much because there isn't any room for other stuff). It really depends on the distro in how much stuff you can pack into how little memory.
Windows 8 has improved performance from Windows 7 for sure. However, if you're using a traditional desktop or notebook PC, it might be frustrating to use, although sadly, I'd say it's less frustrating than using it on an x86 tablet, which the UI was largely designed for. On a normal computer, applications that run in the traditional desktop would probably be used far more than Metro/Modern UI apps. On a tablet, the Metro/Modern UI apps are nice, but you'll also be likely to use traditional applications, and you'll get thrown between the interfaces a lot. So basically, I think Microsoft's mission to redesign Windows wasn't thought out well at all.

P.S. Does anybody else think that Office 2013 looks really ugly, especially with the all-caps tab labels on the ribbon?
ok, so if I can get used to the windows 8 UI, then it is better performance.

is there anyway to overwrite the theme? Make it standard? And not bouncing between UI?
technomonkey76 wrote:
P.S. Does anybody else think that Office 2013 looks really ugly, especially with the all-caps tab labels on the ribbon?


Ribbons are ugly. Office 2007+ uses ribbons. Office 2007+ is ugly.
For the past few months, I have been on an internship with Microsoft, and my main duty there was to write an app for Windows 8. Because of this, I have used Windows 8, VS 2012, and Office 2013, both on a desktop PC (with 2 monitors) and a tablet. Here's my opinion of the three:

- Every feature in Windows 8 apart from the UI is an improvement: nicer looking system, better performance, etc. If you are only considering performance, get Windows 8.
- The UI (which is the thing that everyone is talking about), is somewhat of a mixed bag. On the desktop, I'd say that it took me a week to figure out how to use the new UI, after which I was somewhat comfortable with the interface. I've found ways to avoid having to go into the Metro system (such as putting shortcuts to my apps on the desktop), but as time goes on, you get used to it (e.g. it was so much easier when I learned that you can use the scroll wheel to scroll the Start menu). The problem with the internet is that the majority of people who post on that sort of stuff aren't that patient.
- After I had gotten used to Windows 8 on the desktop, I got to use it on the touch/pen tablet, and it was a dream come true, because it was incredibly easy to switch between my Metro apps via the touch gestures.
- As for VS 2012, the way you interact with the system has never changed. The design has been Metro-ized in that the design is a lot simpler and all of the icons have changed to one or two color Metro style icons, but it is still a desktop app like it has always been, and works the same way.
- Writing for Metro is also pretty nice, once you make sense of the incomplete documentation online. When you write your app, you have the choice of either using HTML with JavaScript, XAML with C#, VB.NET, or C++, or DirectX 11 with C++, which means that it is very likely that you'll get to use a paradigm you're comfortable with.
- As for Office 2013, I actually think it looks awesome, because everything is very fluid. In addition, in Office 2013, it's really easy to work with Windows SkyDrive, a service that gives 7GB or more of cloud storage to all users of Microsoft accounts (which can be created for free).
Compynerd255 wrote:
- The UI (which is the thing that everyone is talking about), is somewhat of a mixed bag. On the desktop, I'd say that it took me a week to figure out how to use the new UI, after which I was somewhat comfortable with the interface. I've found ways to avoid having to go into the Metro system (such as putting shortcuts to my apps on the desktop), but as time goes on, you get used to it (e.g. it was so much easier when I learned that you can use the scroll wheel to scroll the Start menu). The problem with the internet is that the majority of people who post on that sort of stuff aren't that patient.
My desktop has four monitors (sometimes five, if my projector is powered on). How will that work with Metro? I've heard scary things like "only maximized applications are allowed" or thereabouts. Can you tell me how the experience would be for me, given that I am used to Windows 7 and like using it a lot? Does it make sense for me to upgrade given that I have powerful hardware and like performance, or is it too bleeding edge? I need to wipe this computer sooner or later, as it has been three or four years since I did a fresh OS install, but I need to choose whether to stick with 7 or go to 8.
So if I just read that right, Metro is still full color right? Cause what i read its kinda like, going back to 8bit color... Which sounds screwy..

Then again, its been a long day, and I am rather tired.
It kinda reminds 8bit because of the flat colors, but it's far from being just 8bit or 256 colors... Smile

The classic desktop windows in 8 no longer have the gradients or transparencies (but you should be used to having them disabled if you want decent performance with Windows 7 on a laptop, anyway). Metro apps can only run maximized, but classic desktop apps still run in the usual windows which can be minimized, maximized, restored, etc.
In fact, I have heard multiple-monitor support in 8 is improved (couldn't test due to the lack of monitors and compatible graphic cards Wink ), with support for different wallpapers per screen, for example.

I advise both Kerm and Aes to try the Release Preview of 8 at least on a virtual machine, to get a more clear idea of the changes the system implies (also, remember to look into things like the task manager), or the full finished release which only works for 90 days (Microsoft has it published somewhere, don't ask me where as I don't know either). It's hard to tell if you'll like Metro or hate it just from reading reviews, and IMO the best you can do is test Win8 now so you have time for preparing and adapting if the world eventually moves to it.

PS: there are tools to skip the Metro things and bring back the old Start menu; also, I share the same opinion I've read on some Slashdot comments: if the whole Metro UI thing goes wrong and Win8 starts being a flop because of it, MS may just have a magical switch built in the system which takes back the good old Start menu (let's hope) Smile
Ok, well i am putting the full version on my new comp now, and I just WONT register it. (Assuming its like XP and you have 30 days) If I dont like it, I will swap to 7, since i get both free anyway.
gbl08ma wrote:
The classic desktop windows in 8 no longer have the gradients or transparencies (but you should be used to having them disabled if you want decent performance with Windows 7 on a laptop, anyway). Metro apps can only run maximized, but classic desktop apps still run in the usual windows which can be minimized, maximized, restored, etc.
In fact, I have heard multiple-monitor support in 8 is improved (couldn't test due to the lack of monitors and compatible graphic cards Wink ), with support for different wallpapers per screen, for example.

Two other things that should be noted specifically about this:
- If your screen resolution is at least 1366 pixels wide and 768 pixels tall, you also have the option of "snapping" Metro apps, at which point the app shrinks to a 320-pixel-wide area on the side and condenses its UI (e.g. the Calendar app changes to a day view when snapped). The rest of the space can be filled either by another Metro app or by the desktop, and a handle allows you to hide either app or switch the snap/fill state of the app. The desktop can also be snapped, showing taskbar preview windows of all open desktop apps. The Start screen, however, cannot be snapped.
- The Metro experience can only exist on one monitor at a time - attempting to move a snapped app to another monitor or opening a Metro app on another monitor will move the entire Metro experience to that monitor. All other monitors will always show the desktop. In addition, clicking on the taskbar button for a desktop app that resides behind the Metro experience will show the desktop on that monitor (to show the app).
- Oh, yes, and the Taskbar, by default, appears on all desktop screens, so you don't have to go hunting for it anymore. Metro apps, however, do not appear on it, but they do appear in the CoolSwitch (the official name for the Alt-tab window).
That is good to know thanks. Very Happy
Aes_Sedia5 wrote:
Ok, well i am putting the full version on my new comp now, and I just WONT register it. (Assuming its like XP and you have 30 days) If I dont like it, I will swap to 7, since i get both free anyway.

Wait a second - Aes, do you mean that you are installing the full version of Windows 8, and not just the release preview? The Windows 8 you are installing does not have the Evaluation Copy watermark or the default origami fish background? Because if Windows 8 has been released to plebeians, I can talk freely about it.
Aes_Sedia5 wrote:
ok, so if I can get used to the windows 8 UI, then it is better performance.


No, not really. Win 8's performance is more or less the same as Win 7's. It isn't any lighter on resources, either.

Metro is faster than the "classic" desktop, though, and since Win 8 no longer has Aero that is a bit faster as well - but you can always just turn off Aero in 7 if your PC can't handle it.

Windows 8 on a laptop/desktop is an unusable train wreck though - avoid like the plague.
Compy no I am not installing the full version. I believe this is the upgrade only. I cant do a boot install of it, i have to install from windows 7 first. figured that out the hard way.
A topic about the best programming environment and the only options are windows?

BLASPHEMY

Linux is really the king of programming environments. It was made by hobbyist programmers. They knew what they wanted Razz
  
Register to Join the Conversation
Have your own thoughts to add to this or any other topic? Want to ask a question, offer a suggestion, share your own programs and projects, upload a file to the file archives, get help with calculator and computer programming, or simply chat with like-minded coders and tech and calculator enthusiasts via the site-wide AJAX SAX widget? Registration for a free Cemetech account only takes a minute.

» Go to Registration page
Page 1 of 2
» All times are GMT - 5 Hours
 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

 

Advertisement