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Ashbad, thanks very much! I'm glad to hear someone who played the beta and the final version noticing the effort that I put into tweaks and fixes. Smile
Kerm, will you release the source code for this program?

This is looking very nice. Just another thing, do the enemies always hit you when they can or sometimes they fail on purpose?

Good job!
ephan wrote:
Kerm, will you release the source code for this program?

This is looking very nice. Just another thing, do the enemies always hit you when they can or sometimes they fail on purpose?

Good job!
The enemies try to hit you when they can. The lower difficulty level enemies have fewer choices of possible trajectories they can use, and compensate less well than higher difficulty levels for the wind. If they were so set, they would of course hit you every time. I am not currently considering releasing source for this; I've already published most of the relevant routines, as well as my fixed-point library.
KermMartian wrote:
ephan wrote:
Kerm, will you release the source code for this program?

This is looking very nice. Just another thing, do the enemies always hit you when they can or sometimes they fail on purpose?

Good job!
The enemies try to hit you when they can. The lower difficulty level enemies have fewer choices of possible trajectories they can use, and compensate less well than higher difficulty levels for the wind. If they were so set, they would of course hit you every time. I am not currently considering releasing source for this; I've already published most of the relevant routines, as well as my fixed-point library.


Oh that's too bad, I was curious to see the source code. Anyway, thanks!
I'd be happy to send it along to you if you'd like under the usual restrictions that I give people source code when I've chosen not to publish it: don't share it, don't use pieces of it without asking first. Of course, one notable exception occurred where someone didn't listen to me and did so anyway, so I'm (hopefully understandably) leery about releasing code, even on a one-off basis.
KermMartian wrote:
I'd be happy to send it along to you if you'd like under the usual restrictions that I give people source code when I've chosen not to publish it: don't share it, don't use pieces of it without asking first. Of course, one notable exception occurred where someone didn't listen to me and did so anyway, so I'm (hopefully understandably) leery about releasing code, even on a one-off basis.


I completely understand why you prefer to keep your source code private. However, have you considered using a license like GNU to keep it safe from people wanting to use it?
ephan wrote:
KermMartian wrote:
I'd be happy to send it along to you if you'd like under the usual restrictions that I give people source code when I've chosen not to publish it: don't share it, don't use pieces of it without asking first. Of course, one notable exception occurred where someone didn't listen to me and did so anyway, so I'm (hopefully understandably) leery about releasing code, even on a one-off basis.


I completely understand why you prefer to keep your source code private. However, have you considered using a license like GNU to keep it safe from people wanting to use it?


I'm sure someone like Kerm doesn't even need to consider it, for him, it's probably second nature Wink. Keeping things open sourced isn't always the best way to go.
Ephan: People don't tend to honor licenses in the community. Doors CS was under a very restricted but public license from betas of Doors CS 6 through early betas of Doors CS 7, and several people abused the source for routines despite the license expressly forbidding doing so. Anyway, I sent ephan the source, and invited him to post any questions he may have here.
...You've got to admit that that color display is intense though! ... I mean, the programming (however/whatever, so long as it's legit) is worth that!
shkaboinka wrote:
...You've got to admit that that color display is intense though! ... I mean, the programming (however/whatever, so long as it's legit) is worth that!
Definitely, and indeed, the Prizm version of Obliterate in C was much faster to write, even with learning to use the display and building up a library of my own fixed-point math routines, than the TI version.
The game looks pretty cool from the screenshots. Is it just for the prism or is there a TI version too? (I probably know the answer, but just asking.)
adamac15 wrote:
The game looks pretty cool from the screenshots. Is it just for the prism or is there a TI version too? (I probably know the answer, but just asking.)


This is actually somewhat of a port of his 84+ gCn version Smile Obliterate 84+ is available in the Cemetech archives.
Kerm,
Any chance of making the tanks movable?
Also, how hard do you think it would be to mod this code and make calculator angry birds?

Thanks,
Owen
Oweng4000 wrote:
Also, how hard do you think it would be to mod this code and make calculator angry birds?


To answer this question from educated guesswork, very hard. All that you would likely keep from this would likely be parts of the projection algorithm, the rest would have to be written from scratch around a more Angry Birds-like design. Correct me if I'm wrong, Kerm.
adamac and Ashbad, the TI-83+/84+ version of Obliterate: http://www.cemetech.net/news.php?year=2011&month=all&id=444

Oweng: movable tanks would be doable. Angry Birds would be significantly harder, because you'd need to design a simple physics engine.
The only thing you could keep from Obliterate really is just the object trajectory code which is not overtly difficult to write for anyone who's taken a course in physics before. As for the buildings the physics is much more complex as there are many factors to consider including advanced collision detection.
z80man, the math wasn't the hard part, it was the implementation that was hard since I had to write a fixed-point library including integer conversion, normal operations, and sine/cosine. It wasn't a huge task, but it was nontrivial. Smile
KermMartian wrote:
adamac and Ashbad, the TI-83+/84+ version of Obliterate: http://www.cemetech.net/news.php?year=2011&month=all&id=444

Oweng: movable tanks would be doable. Angry Birds would be significantly harder, because you'd need to design a simple physics engine.


https://github.com/slembcke/Chipmunk-Physics will this work?
From glancing over the source repository and the readme, it certainly looks like it. Is this something you're interested in trying? Because sadly I haven't the time for it.
Well, I decided to chillax and play some Oblit on my Prizm tonight (latest version, 1.0) and I played a few games straight, with me and two bots, on the level 3 difficulty. In my 4th or so game, the game just entirely "froze" up for two minutes after one of the two bots was eliminated by me, and the other bot shot a bullet over me into the right bounds of the screen. It *did* unfreeze, which seemed even more weird. Sadly, it all happened too quick to be able to tell much more and give possible theories. Shall spend sometime trying to recreate the incident and report with a less vague description.

I shall also note, objectively and quite congratulatory to Kerm, this is the first time anything strange has happened in the first ~20 total hours I've played version 1.0.
  
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