Anakclusmos wrote:
no, the idea would be to only heat the tip of the pen so it wouldnt melt in the barrel, and with a small focused point it should take less power to use.
Um, you just repeated what you said in your last post and didn't bother answering my question.
by electromechanically approaching the idea you mean...?
Anakclusmos wrote:
by electromechanically approaching the idea you mean...?
Like, how are you going to make sure that only the tip of the iron heats up?
Surprised Dunno, just thought i'd be a good idea.
Anakclusmos wrote:
Surprised Dunno, just thought i'd be a good idea.
Well sure, but you can't throw the idea out without backing it up with some engineering! Come on, gimme so possibilities so I can try to shoot them down or say that you've found it. The adversarial design process is key to creating robust, reliable products.
well, how about using a higher density non-conductive metal alloy?and besides that doesn't cold-touch mean it doesn't use heat?

Mad If anyone steals this idea I'll sue you into the next dimension, where monkeys from aissuR eat live people brains!

Check out my website: http://sourcecore.webs.com
DJ Omnimaga wrote:
Sonlen wrote:
KermMartian wrote:
qazz42 wrote:
yeah, but it is possible to emulate the snes ...
Yeah, but a slow machine that can emulate an NES can't necessarily emulate an SNES, whereas something that can emulate an SNES almost definitely can emulate an NES. Similarly, just because the Nspire can emulate a GBC doesn't mean it has enough capabilities to emulate a GBA in anything close to realtime.

That is a slight understatement, the Nintendo DS cannot even emulate a GBA game.
Take that into thought.
Although with the original Nintendo DS there was a GBA cartridge slot built-in. I don't remember about the DS Lite, though.


I don't know if anyone mentioned this, but the DS and the DS Lite had a separate "core" for the GBA slot 2 games, you can't play GBA "ROMS" on a DS slot 1 card because it cannot access the GBA bit of the DS.
well, there is a NES rom packaging tool for the gba that converts NES roms to GBA roms.I think its called PSNES? I use it and the only issues I have is the bios error (which i believe is solely the Virtual GBA's problem) and some slight flickering.other than that, the games run at a somewhat normal pace with great sound quality.
That's good to hear. Also, I just saw your note about cold touch: no, it still uses heat as far as I understand it. I believe that it's just designed to heat up and cool down very quickly.
Sad ah that sucks...Well, as for the idea, whadga tink?
Some "cold" soldering irons work by using a split tip with a voltage across each side of the tip. Touching this tip against a metal surface shorts out the two halves and a high current flows, producing heat, which melts the solder and forms a joint. However, a good solder joint generally requires that the solder, pad and component are heated together, and the high current from the tip can easily fry electronic components. In short, some cold soldering irons aren't very good.
benryves wrote:
Some "cold" soldering irons work by using a split tip with a voltage across each side of the tip. Touching this tip against a metal surface shorts out the two halves and a high current flows, producing heat, which melts the solder and forms a joint. However, a good solder joint generally requires that the solder, pad and component are heated together, and the high current from the tip can easily fry electronic components. In short, some cold soldering irons aren't very good.
That sounds like an absolutely terrible idea! I could very easily see a case where, for example, you could accidentally touch the two halves to different legs of a fine-pitched IC and destroy it.
i meant the first idea, using a high density non-conductive metal alloy for the barrel.kinda like the cooling block on the a computers processor.
Anakclusmos wrote:
i meant the first idea, using a high density non-conductive metal alloy for the barrel.kinda like the cooling block on the a computers processor.
I see the idea you're getting at, but you're a little vague on the different between conduction/insulation and heat capacity of a material. All metals are, to some extent, conductors (both of heat and of electricity). It shouldn't surprise you to learn that conduction of heat and electricity are both closely related to the atomic composition of metal. What you want is a metal with a (low?) heat capacity. In other words, something that holds heat very poorly. You want something that can be easily heated up, and therefore will very readily lose its heat to its surroundings, which will let it cool down very quickly. The only problem is that you'll have difficulties getting the tip hot enough to melt solder with that; you won't be able to build up the required temperature easily because the heat will keep escaping into the environment.
  
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