Hi!

My name is Dagfinn. I work in a university, were my professional subject is philosophy. Computing is more of a hobby. I am interested in educational software and teaching kids to code, as well as the history and philosophy of programming languages. Calculator programming touches on all these issues, hence my interest in this site!

I have a TI84+, a CASIO FX 2.0 as well as a few HP models. Philosophically, it is interesting too see how these machines implement programming capabilities in a minimalistic fashion. You really get to see the underlying principles in operation. Personally I am intrigued by languages such as FORTH and BCPL, so I like to keep it small (and simple, as Chuck Moore, the inventor of Forth, would say.)

I should like to learn something about ASM on the TI84 Plus --- the very notion of assembler programming on a small platform takes me back to my formative years with a BBC micro!

By the way, this site is a brilliant effort!!

Cheers!
AppleJS wrote:
Hello, everyone!

My name is Tyler. I'm a web developer by trade, but I have really been wanting to get into lower-level systems to expand my knowledge before I head off into college.

I actually just picked up a TI-84 CE this weekend, and am already dabbling around with some C programs I am beginning to write (I have no experience with C, a little bit with C++ from my Arduino days.)
Welcome to Cemetech! Do you have any Arduino projects you'd like to share with us, since we deal with computer and embedded programming and projects too?

Quote:
I'm eagerly awaiting a beta build of Doors CE to get some real programming going.
With tr1p1ea being so conscientious in working on xLIBCE, we're looking good for a public beta in the not-too-far future. As far as experimenting with C programming for now, you're probably aware of MateoConLechuga's C SDK and libraries, which are also available within our online SourceCoder 3 tool.

Quote:
I actually come with a very big idea in mind, that i'd like to eventually make a reality.

My idea is to write a program for the CE that can take full advantage of the display and essentially create a full-on web browser for the calculator.

Now, I know this isn't actually possible (rendering HTML+CSS on the calc's processor) but hear me out! My idea is to use a raspberry pi (or any unix system) alongside NodeJS to render the HTML and network it over to the calculator, where I will have a C program that displays it.

Now, I don't actually know if all that is possible (by that I mean the networking of data), but I'm optimistic. Smile
It's not as far-fetched as you might think. I created CALCnet 2.2, a networking protocol well-suited to the calculators' hardware, then built globalCALCnet on top of it. Among the applications for globalCALCnet is Gossamer 1.0, a web browser that uses a daemon running on a server to turn webpages into text via Lynx, then feeds that text with clickable links to a globalCALCnet-connected calculator. Although getting a calculator on the internet initially required a computer to act as a bridge, my Spark Core gCn bridge project eliminated that necessity.

With all that said, the lack of a serial (I/O or DBUS) port on the TI-84 Plus CE means things are now a little bit more complicated. Recent developments suggest that the TI-84 Plus CE will be able to speak RS232 serial-over-USB to Arduino and similar devices with future OS versions, which may simplify things; we shall see. Good luck with the project and the learning, and great to have you with us!
My name is CalcMax. I am a 16 year old serbian-american tech geek. I have this account here to ask for tech help and to share all my publically relevant knowledge . I don't have much free time during the school year, so i will be most active in the summer. My mail problem in life is that i got some batd and evil profs in school. I have a ti84+se, casioi fx300sa, and a citizen sr260n. i also have been using my Elenco Snap Circuits set since december 2006. I will be an electrical engineer when I grow up. I also have an IQ of over 150 and possibly off the scale (couldn't be properly measured because I got sleepy at the end of the test). I know ti-basic and am using Kerms book to learn more. I am also in love with the hottest chic on the planet. Rolling Eyes Razz TI-84+ SE
My name is calcnerd_CEP_D. I have been visiting Cemetech for several months now, and know a lot about calculators. I know ti-basic, and I am learning C, since I have a have a TI-84+ CE. I had to get it for school, but soon found out about the games. I came here looking for games to put on my calculator, and I started from there. I am hoping to someday make some games of my own for the CE. I'm also working on some basic games, and hoping Doors CE 9 comes out soon to add hybrid basic libraries to my calculator.
calcnerd_CEP_D wrote:
My name is calcnerd_CEP_D. I have been visiting Cemetech for several months now, and know a lot about calculators. I know ti-basic, and I am learning C, since I have a have a TI-84+ CE. I had to get it for school, but soon found out about the games. I came here looking for games to put on my calculator, and I started from there. I am hoping to someday make some games of my own for the CE. I'm also working on some basic games, and hoping Doors CE 9 comes out soon to add hybrid basic libraries to my calculator.

This is literally me in so many ways. Only differences include:
I got my ti 84 pce because I could, they supply ti nspires at the school.
I came here looking for programs, more to study code from, but games are good as well.
I am not hoping to make games in the future, or, atleast, that is not one of my main goals. I am focusing on learning JavaScript, java, and C(++) before I go into asm (which the best games are programmed in (although, I will delve deeply into hybrid basic once DCE comes out)).
Caleb_Hill wrote:
calcnerd_CEP_D wrote:
My name is calcnerd_CEP_D. I have been visiting Cemetech for several months now, and know a lot about calculators. I know ti-basic, and I am learning C, since I have a have a TI-84+ CE. I had to get it for school, but soon found out about the games. I came here looking for games to put on my calculator, and I started from there. I am hoping to someday make some games of my own for the CE. I'm also working on some basic games, and hoping Doors CE 9 comes out soon to add hybrid basic libraries to my calculator.

This is literally me in so many ways. Only differences include:
I got my ti 84 pce because I could, they supply ti nspires at the school.
I came here looking for programs, more to study code from, but games are good as well.
I am not hoping to make games in the future, or, atleast, that is not one of my main goals. I am focusing on learning JavaScript, java, and C(++) before I go into asm (which the best games are programmed in (although, I will delve deeply into hybrid basic once DCE comes out)).

You guys do know that hybrid basic is already available for the monochrome 83 and 84, as well as the CSE, In fact, as far as I know, Hybrid Basic for the CE will be exactly the same as the CSE with one or two commands added (ExecHex and ToString I think) You don't really have to wait for Doors 9.0 to come out to learn it. Although if you don't own these calcs, it might be easier to learn it through a bit of trial and error... But essentially what I'm saying is, you can create programs that utilise hybrid basic libs before it is released for the CE (Like me and PT_ are currently doing with TILES)
Actually, hybrid BASIC already exists on the 84+CE, even though DCE9 isn't out yet. It's called CE Textlib and it can do both colored text and draw rectangles, among other things. What isn't known much about it is that its rectangle command and its command chaining ability can be abused enough to generate Intellivision/Atari-style graphics without any calculator crashes and stability issues (other than the gray status bar text not being redrawn when exiting without ON Break+quit)



But if you don't mind waiting for DCE9 or have a CSE, then I recommend DCE9's xLIBCE capabilities, especially now that it will include CE Textlib's rectangle chaining ability
Caleb_Hill: You're right. I've tried getting into asm, but I never understood it. Thats why I want to learn C, its more powerful than basic, but a lot easier than asm.

mr womp womp: Yes, I know I could program in Hybrid Basic now, but since I only have a CE, I can't test the programs at all. I can't use an emulator, either, since I can't get my hands on any of my friends calculators.
Hello!

Something really long was supposed to go here.. but I lost it. My login session expired and it didn't save a draft automatically.

I use 84+CSE, but it might as well be an 84- given its sluggishness in practically everything. I'm experienced in TI-BASIC but I'm fed up with it given it's an interpreted language and I can only see 8 lines of it at a time. So I'm trying to learn the ins and outs of Z80 ASM, but the general weirdness of the API (and outright lack of some things) is making progress slow. The architecture of the Z80 isn't the problem, though, given I have adequate experience working on a Game Boy emulator. My first big project/goal will be to make an ASM editor, obviously to be able to edit programs on the go. Razz Computers are one big self-replicating virus.

I think the 84 is a little kid's calculator, so my intent is to get a new calculator and learn it before I go to college. I don't really want to buy any new calculators from TI; I think the prices are extortion given some of the calculators are barely $50 parts, labor, and R&D. Look at it this way: the TI-84s are graphing calculators with a screen resolution lower than that of a Game Boy from 1989 and a CPU from 1976 only a step up from an 8080, and they're sold at $100!

My school district is now transitioning to TI-Nspire (apparently the Algebra students have a need for it! Or maybe because the district is compensating for substandard teacher quality with its immense wealth Rolling Eyes ), although to my chagrin my statistics teacher insists that I "keep my hands off those calculators." I told him I was curious about how to use them, given I barely ever have the opportunity to get my hands on one of them. If anyone has any suggestions for what calculator I should use (my priorities are programming ease and practicality), I would be happy to hear them.

Nice to meet all of you!
Sorry to hear that your really long introduction post got lost, oldmud0, but welcome! I hope that you'll have the patience to rewrite it after you have a few hours' or days' break from that frustration, as I'm sure it would be interesting backstory that I (and we) would enjoy reading. Anyway, to dive into your post. Yes, the TI-84 Plus CSE is a remarkably slow calculator, and writing TI-BASIC on it is a pain, but there are better ways: with Doors CSE 8, the TI-BASIC editor is modified so you can (a) view 10 lines at a time and perhaps more importantly (b) scroll 10 lines at a time instantly, not with slow scrolling. If you've tried that and it's still not enough, you can always use SourceCoder 3 to write TI-BASIC directly on your computer, and if you dump the ROM image off your calculator, you can use the built-in jsTIfied emulator to test your programs from within SourceCoder. I'm glad to hear that you're attempting z80 ASM, and we'd be more than happy to help with any questions there. If you're in the process of learning and have a lot of different questions you think you'll be asking, we often recommend a (in this case) "OldMud0's ASM Questions" thread in our z80 and ez80 Assembly subforum.

I'm not sure that I'd quite classify the TI-84 Plus family as little kids' calculators in terms of programmability, especially with the faster speed, C-friendly ez80 CPU, and sleeker design of the TI-84 Plus CE. The prices are indeed very high, but you're paying a lot more for the calculator than just the parts. Take a look at my interview with the president of TI Education, Dr. Peter Balyta for more about where that money actually goes. I've been working vaguely with TI to push programming as something they should be encouraging more in schools, though, so I've gotten someone swayed towards the value of their philanthropic efforts, and your mileage may vary. If you're dead-set on not getting a TI-84 Plus CE, and you are thinking about a science/math/engineering field for college, one of the best options at this point might be the HP Prime (review). Have you been considering that, slash what options have you been looking at?
I'm still looking at options for calculators; maybe I will get the Plus CE anyway. The hardware in the PCSE is grossly outdated, although the PCE is rather tall. I actually registered to use SourceCoder which really is a great tool.

Oh yeah... I was intending to joke about how every time I read "cemetech" I think of "cemetery for tech" Razz
Hi everyone,

I don't really have much to say about myself. I own a TI-84+CSE. I am trying to learn z80 on it because basic is way too slow for me. I hope to make something like axe for the CSE in the near future (although with my skills it will probably be the far future Smile ).

I am iffy on many languages, such as Python, JS, and Java, but I know HTML and CSS pretty well.

That's all! Thanks!

P.S.: I was going to post this half an hour ago, but I got distracted by Kerm destroying Hyped for ripping off his projects. Go Kerm! Smile
Hey, fluzz, and welcome to Cemetech! Smile

I have a CSE as well, and the regular BASIC is super slow, but have you tried hybrid basic? You can get some pretty nice games running using it, like Flappy bird, 2048 and some others. I use that all the time when programming on the CSE, as I could never figure ASM out. Long story short, I suggest checking out xLIBC and Celtic!

An Axe language probably would not be feasable because of the speed the calc runs at, but you never know!

I hope you enjoy your stay!
Hi everyone,
there's not too much to say about myself. I had to buy a Casio fx-cg 20 for school, and at that time I only knew Java and Visual Basic. I quickly became interested in programming Add-ins for my calculator and found all the games that had already been coded for the prizm. I started to learn C and coded my own Mandelbrot-set grapher as an Add-in. Recently I've been playing around with Lindenmayer systems and I'm now coding an Add-in to display these. I'll post my results when I'm done with the project. That's all so far!
What up all? I'm an 8th grader who likes pretty much all things technology. I started coding when i saw that one of my friends was playing Pac Man on his calc. I then decide I wanted to learn how to calculator code and I've loved calculator programming ever since!
Unicorn wrote:
I have a CSE as well, and the regular BASIC is super slow, but have you tried hybrid basic?


Well, "looked for a complete tutorial and couldn't find one" is more accurate than "tried." There is actual documentation for Celtic, but I can't find anything for xlibc. I've looked everywhere, and the only one that I can actually learn from and that I can find is you and PT_'s, which isn't finished. (If you wouldn't mind finishing it, that would be great!)

Unicorn wrote:
An Axe language probably would not be feasable because of the speed the calc runs at, but you never know!


Yeah, I forgot how slow this thing is. Smile I'm not completely sure how Axe works, but I'm hoping to create something that just takes regular basic and converts into raw assembly. It could even be written in Python or something, but since Basic is interpreted and not compiled, I assume compiling it beforehand will improve speed, right?

PS: Hey, in MateoConLechuga's description of his portal game, he says you made 38 levels in a level pack, except I can't find them. Could you please tell me where they are? Thanks! Very Happy
fluzz wrote:
Unicorn wrote:
I have a CSE as well, and the regular BASIC is super slow, but have you tried hybrid basic?


Well, "looked for a complete tutorial and couldn't find one" is more accurate than "tried." There is actual documentation for Celtic, but I can't find anything for xlibc. I've looked everywhere, and the only one that I can actually learn from and that I can find is you and PT_'s, which isn't finished. (If you wouldn't mind finishing it, that would be great!)

Yeah, we really need to work on that. I think we both got distracted with projects Razz
What really helped me, though, is this page on the SDK website, and creating a topic to ask for help Wink
fluzz wrote:

Unicorn wrote:
An Axe language probably would not be feasable because of the speed the calc runs at, but you never know!


Yeah, I forgot how slow this thing is. Smile I'm not completely sure how Axe works, but I'm hoping to create something that just takes regular basic and converts into raw assembly. It could even be written in Python or something, but since Basic is interpreted and not compiled, I assume compiling it beforehand will improve speed, right?

PS: Hey, in MateoConLechuga's description of his portal game, he says you made 38 levels in a level pack, except I can't find them. Could you please tell me where they are? Thanks! Very Happy


I'm not sure about that python Idea, but I doubt it would work, though you should check with Mateo/Kerm about such things, I'm not the most knowledgable on the topic. About the levels, they should be included, try to navigate to the other levels option in the main program. Wink
Introduction post!

So, I started trying to learn assembly for my ti84+se and have started using Cemetech [Cement Tech?] as a reference often. I figured I can get an account and then I can contribute something maybe too! Very Happy

Only not yet, no <finished> projects of mine. So that's it I guess?
Hi all Smile
Would you mind pointing me to the topic where you asked for help? I think that would be beneficial to me. I have no idea what goes in "Args."

I looked in the other levels, but it just says "empty." Is there a file I have to include?
Make a topic in a calculator subforum, such as Z80 ASM, General Programing, orTI BASIC.

The file should be called PORTALP1, if you did not send that. Wink Though that reminds me, I should submit the levels to the archives.
  
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