Is there anyway to connect to TI83+ calculators wirelessly? Smile
Yes, but it is yet to be made Smile
Here's my proposal (idk if it would work)

1: Use the ends of a calculator cable, and attach it to some method of reaching a PC. I don't really know how the calc sends data, but chop it up into 'packets' and transmit it to the computer.
2: The PC should be like a router, sending the 'packets' of data to the other calculator.

Perhaps even skip the PC? idk if it'd work, but meh.

I have no idea what I am talking about, so take my ideas with a grain of salt.
You can use an ultra-low-power NRF24L01(+) transceiver and then build matching circuits for both calculators. I think you could even use the power coming from the I/O port for RX/TX.
Kerm has already worked on similar things before. Obviously, natively, the calc's can't do it, they will need modifications or external hardware. The crude way would be to simply use the GCN, hook the calculators up to a spark core or a photon like this and essentially use a server to do all the work. The better way that afaik has not really been explored would be to use ArTICL to hook up the calculators to a pair of bluetooth compatible arduinos to setup a sort of crude WPAN. Not sure about how the latter would be carried out though.
oldmud0 wrote:
You can use an ultra-low-power NRF24L01(+) transceiver and then build matching circuits for both calculators. I think you could even use the power coming from the I/O port for RX/TX.


He knows what he is doing.

I don't.


looking at your suggestion, it appears solid, but like I said, I don't know what I am doing. People, het on it!
There are a few ways that come to mind immediately

1) Using an ad-hoc network between computer linked to calcs, wireless connectivity could be achieved, though I don't think lugging a computer everywhere is what you really want.

2) simply splicing your transfer cable with a radio transmitter/receiver, transistor, and battery to both calcs would work. These transmitters and recievers are very easy to find in amazon for cheap or in a kit of other common electronics.
Would the radio thing work, CalcMeister? I think that would mess up the encoding?
Pieman7373 wrote:
Would the radio thing work, CalcMeister? I think that would mess up the encoding?
The common radio transmitter will be have such a higher frequency than the calc that that will not be an issue. Each on has four contacts, traditionally. 5V, GND, Data+, Data-
I definitely do not want the calculators connected to a computer. I was thinking of a messaging program wirelessly between two different calculators for math class communications. Razz

Could you give me an example link to that radio thing, Calcmeister? Smile
Here's one (I DON'T SUPPORT THIS IN ANY WAY!!!take a joke....): rip out all of the electronics in a calc (keeping the shell, and screen, and gluing the button covers down to a piece of cardboard, then taping that to the inside.)

Copy the screen onto a piece of clear, thin plastic. (so you can interact with the phone).

Tape the film screen to the hole where the original screen was.

Rig it up so that you can text through the hole where the screen was, and turn it off easily.

Add small hinges to the side, so you can open it, to remove/insert the screen and/or phone.

Put your phone in it, and then when the teacher comes by, turn it off.

Genius, right?!

This is a really goodalso a joke, it's are horrible idea bad idea if you think about it. I think it may void the warranty on the calc, but I'm not sure. also a joke. TI should add "do not try any of _iPhoenix_'s ideas, as that will result in "bad things happening"
You mean this?



Razz
PT_ wrote:
You mean this?



Razz

Until the teacher collects all the calculators
Something like that.

But like a million times better. Make it like a Japan Toilet!

Basically, better, cuz of larger screen. You can do more!
Switchblade wrote:
I definitely do not want the calculators connected to a computer. I was thinking of a messaging program wirelessly between two different calculators for math class communications. Razz

Could you give me an example link to that radio thing, Calcmeister? Smile

You mean this?

EDIT: The wireless part has also been figured out. Here is a link to Kerm's post about using a Spark Core (a WiFi development board) to connect to the gCn wirelessly.

As for how to setup the gCn bridge, that is all explained here.
mr womp womp wrote:
Switchblade wrote:
I definitely do not want the calculators connected to a computer. I was thinking of a messaging program wirelessly between two different calculators for math class communications. Razz

Could you give me an example link to that radio thing, Calcmeister? Smile

You mean this?


Yeah, except I want the connection between the calculator and the computer to be wireless.

EDIT:

Can someone tell me how to connect my calc to Calcnet in the first place?
Switchblade wrote:
mr womp womp wrote:
Switchblade wrote:
I definitely do not want the calculators connected to a computer. I was thinking of a messaging program wirelessly between two different calculators for math class communications. Razz

Could you give me an example link to that radio thing, Calcmeister? Smile

You mean this?


Yeah, except I want the connection between the calculator and the computer to be wireless.

EDIT:

Can someone tell me how to connect my calc to Calcnet in the first place?


In order to use wireless connectivity on calculators like Calcnet, you will need external controller boards that will connect the calculators to a PC. You will need this hardware on both calculators you want to connect, which might look suspicious in a classroom. Plus, if you were willing to bring a laptop into class, you may as well just play games wirelessly on the computer instead, unless of course you desperately need to play the games that are only on a TI-84.

Building standalone hardware to connect a calculator directly to the internet would not only require much more software on the calculator, but it will probably draw power that the calculator could not provide.
The calculator allows you to quickly determine whether you have enough clearance above a particular obstruction in the RF path, or alternatively, how high you need to elevate your antennas to clear the obstruction.
I managed to get a WiFi chip and an ATtiny inside the TI-84. Powered from the AAA batteries and connected internally to the TI link port. With a bit of server-side code it lets you chat online. By replacing the WiFi module with a simple transceiver like the nrf24l01 this could easily be modified to work in an ad-hoc network between calculators rather than connecting to the internet.
  
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