Mac, PC, or Linux OS
PC
 75%  [ 3 ]
Linux
 25%  [ 1 ]
Mac
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 4

ok. how much ram would be good?
Edit: how is it horrible advice?
Get the Eluktronics Max 15 or Mag 15.

https://www.eluktronics.com/MAX-15
https://www.eluktronics.com/MAG-15
MateoConLechuga wrote:
Alvajoy123 wrote:
Here some few tips and tricks Razz

  • Just make sure it's used or refurbished.

  • Make sure cpu speed is higher than 1.5ghz.

  • It does not matter if it's a mac, windows, or chromebook.

  • Prefer something without a fan in it as you don't want your fan going turbo mode in the middle of class.

  • Overall just make sure it's portable.

This is all horrible advice 0x5


Lol, dont get a chromebook. Pls. They have intel celeron cous which are poopi. If u are doing big boy editing then get
something quad core or more and you should stick to Windows. 16 gigs of ram is good.
Alvajoy123 wrote:
Here some few tips and tricks Razz

  • Just make sure it's used or refurbished.

  • Make sure cpu speed is higher than 1.5ghz.

  • It does not matter if it's a mac, windows, or chromebook.

  • Prefer something without a fan in it as you don't want your fan going turbo mode in the middle of class.

  • Overall just make sure it's portable.

Sir, you've described a brick with "computor" written on it in magic marker. He needs a real machine.

    - Refurb is fine, but expect the lifetime to be a few years over or under what it should be, normally the latter. Expect a repair at some point, probably not something major.

    - I know you're joking since you said 1.5 Ghz, you can't run Windows on that (usably), let alone edit videos. 3.4 Ghz is about average these days. citation needed

    - Apple will always rip you off, Chromebooks are a mockery of a PC, "windows" isn't a PC. Get a Dell or HP if you want something boring but usful, Asus if you want a shiny gaming machine, and a Lenovo if you hate yourself.

    - I don't even have words for "no fan." Yeah just use your superman ice-breath I guess, or maybe watercool it. You have to have a fan, and no matter what it's going to turbo when you edit videos, but a constant or random hum when just editing a word document is a really bad sign of a cooling issue, it should be fairly quiet.

    -Well yes, that's a laptop. Just make sure it fits in your backpack, my first machine didn't and I had to send it back.
I got a refurbished Elitebook 840, the 2.1 Ghz can somehow run Astroneer at 15 FPS and Minecraft at ~40 on a good day, it's not supposed to turbo at all but I've seen it struggling at 2.7 Ghz when doing anything at all. 8 Gb of RAM is all I really need, but video editing would need around 16 for sure (and that's just a minimum). I really wish I'd gotten something with a dedicated graphics card, which is also a must for your needs. Laptops tend to throttle a lot, so they can be speedy for a few minutes before they heat up. In my own opinion for you and for past me, ditch the dreams of a speedy laptop and get something fast but simple for school, and a PC tower with a graphics card and SSD thrown into it for real gaming and experimentation.
King Dub Dub wrote:
Alvajoy123 wrote:
Here some few tips and tricks Razz

  • Just make sure it's used or refurbished.

  • Make sure cpu speed is higher than 1.5ghz.

  • It does not matter if it's a mac, windows, or chromebook.

  • Prefer something without a fan in it as you don't want your fan going turbo mode in the middle of class.

  • Overall just make sure it's portable.

Sir, you've described a brick with "computor" written on it in magic marker. He needs a real machine.

    - Refurb is fine, but expect the lifetime to be a few years over or under what it should be, normally the latter. Expect a repair at some point, probably not something major.

    - I know you're joking since you said 1.5 Ghz, you can't run Windows on that (usably), let alone edit videos. 3.4 Ghz is about average these days. citation needed

    - Apple will always rip you off, Chromebooks are a mockery of a PC, "windows" isn't a PC. Get a Dell or HP if you want something boring but usful, Asus if you want a shiny gaming machine, and a Lenovo if you hate yourself.

    - I don't even have words for "no fan." Yeah just use your superman ice-breath I guess, or maybe watercool it. You have to have a fan, and no matter what it's going to turbo when you edit videos, but a constant or random hum when just editing a word document is a really bad sign of a cooling issue, it should be fairly quiet.

    -Well yes, that's a laptop. Just make sure it fits in your backpack, my first machine didn't and I had to send it back.
I got a refurbished Elitebook 840, the 2.1 Ghz can somehow run Astroneer at 15 FPS and Minecraft at ~40 on a good day, it's not supposed to turbo at all but I've seen it struggling at 2.7 Ghz when doing anything at all. 8 Gb of RAM is all I really need, but video editing would need around 16 for sure (and that's just a minimum). I really wish I'd gotten something with a dedicated graphics card, which is also a must for your needs. Laptops tend to throttle a lot, so they can be speedy for a few minutes before they heat up. In my own opinion for you and for past me, ditch the dreams of a speedy laptop and get something fast but simple for school, and a PC tower with a graphics card and SSD thrown into it for real gaming and experimentation.


Thats better advice, lol 😂
Well, I ended up getting a Razer blade, upgrading the memory and disks, and installing several Linux distros. I have 32gb of RAM, of which ~6gb is used by zsys as a buffer. I just got the lowest end option and stuck two 1TB SSDs in it.
It's pretty good.

2.6-4.9Ghz, 6 cores (12 logical) intel i7
Nvidia GTX 1660Ti - my biggest source of headaches
32Gb RAM
1Tb NVME SSD
1Tb SATA SSD
Michael0x18 wrote:
Well, I ended up getting a Razer blade, upgrading the memory and disks, and installing several Linux distros. I have 32gb of RAM, of which ~6gb is used by zsys as a buffer. I just got the lowest end option and stuck two 1TB SSDs in it.
It's pretty good.

2.6-4.9Ghz, 6 cores (12 logical) intel i7
Nvidia GTX 1660Ti - my biggest source of headaches
32Gb RAM
1Tb NVME SSD
1Tb SATA SSD


That is pretty freakin awesome, but it might be overkill for randomguy's needs, lol. by twelve cores logical, that means hyperthreading is enabled, right? And also 1660 tis aren't bad, but that is probably the worst part of your build, even though its awesome.
Well, it's Nvidia. And I use Linux. (Google "Linus Torvalds Nvidia" for details.)
This is only half related to this topic, but what soldering mask do you guys recommend?
https://www.amazon.com/YESWELDER-Powered-Darkening-Welding-Helmet/dp/B07QJ1Y527/ref=mp_s_a_1_16?dchild=1
I already have a welding kit and helmet, what SOLDERING mask would you recommend?
Michael0x18 wrote:
Well, it's Nvidia. And I use Linux. (Google "Linus Torvalds Nvidia" for details.)

So NVIDIA, **** you.

What an amazing man. (I use arch btw...)
randomguy wrote:
I am looking for. I am looking for a good quality laptop that I will use when I go to college in 3 years. I am looking for
  • 16+ gigs mem,
  • at least 260 gigs storage,
  • a decent display,
  • and a life at least 10 years.

I am currently using a macbook air mid 2012, which works fine for ordinary stuff, but since I am learning video editing, and want to run development applications, I need something significantly more powerful. And if it helps, I am probably going to do something related to computer science/development in college.
Thank you in advance! Very Happy


Michael0x18 wrote:
I would strongly recommend that you do not purchase a Mac if you are planning to do any serious programming. Macs have many, many issues that complicate development (sometimes to the point of being unusable).


It's clear Michael has an anti-Apple stance, as do many on this forum. But Randomguy, I implore you to do some research once you have suggestions here. Perhaps research what systems tech companies use for programming and editing studios use for editing. I can at least say editing studios don't use laptops but at least you'll know the OS and software they use; the OS will probably lean a majority one way with the software being split between various "ecosystems" (DaVinci Resolve, Adobe, Final Cut, etc for editing). You'll have your editing software (previously mentioned), VFX software, and probably others that I am not aware of.

As one of the few Apple fans here, Mac gets a lot of things right. You've had the same MacBook for 8+ years now, or at the very least it's 8+ years old. Macs are made with metal which have a very long quality of life. Plastic will age, fatigue, and as a result tend to break long before the age of your MacBook Air. Not saying there aren't quality Windows laptops but don't think you're saving money by getting a cheaper laptop.

Quote:
The M1 Macbook Air doesn't even have a fan, or any openings in the case for air flow.


Because it doesn't really need one. On top of what Lionel wrote of the architecture being efficient, it'll still get hot, yes, but it'll take a while. I can't say I recommend an M1 as companies may still be adopting and transition workflows to the new chipset. However, in 10 years Apple will be fully transitioned from Intel and the companies today will be providing Apple MX devices.

I use a 2018 Mac mini (32GB of RAM + 512GB NVM.e) for video/photo editing and I don't do programming these days. It's no power house but it does what I need. Editing two angle 1080p multi-cams just fine, starts to stutter at three. Things get a little stutter when I add in transitions and effects but that's only because it's rendering in real time. Once the video project is rendered to disk, everything is great. It only stutters because it needs to render the other angles at the same time, so I have 2+1 1080p feeds on my monitor. Two streams for the angles and the +1 is the project view with the title cards and any effects layered on top.

I don't know what your video experience is but just know that the laptop you buy will not last ten years in video editing. You're going to grow in terms of your ability and equipment, and video files will get bigger. You may be doing one camera projects today but soon upgrading to two and three camera projects where you'll need to switch between cameras for a scene and you'll need to apply small color corrections because the cameras are slightly different (especially true if you use different brands, Canon mixed with Sony, etc etc).

Then maybe you'll do a project on Blackmagic cameras. You'll start editing in 14-Bit raw video (or whatever they're at now). That laptop won't be much help. Sure, you can edit a 720p proxy file but you're still going to be lagged down in some regard.

10 years is a long time. I replaced my 2011 Mac mini after 7 years. Using a 2018 Mac mini now.

It's absolutely doable but as you enter your career you're going to be looking at upgrading far sooner. You won't be getting jobs as a video editor or videographer when you need a month to deliver the end result. Because others will have rigs that are at most a year behind who can do the same project in a week or less.

I honestly think you're better off getting a slightly used laptop and putting the money you save into a storage solution. I have a 48TB Network Attached Storage that houses my video and photo projects. You don't need anywhere that much but it's not a bad idea to get started on that today.

I applaud you for wanting to be frugal but the reality is that once you start doing video editing as a career, or a serious hobby, you're going to want up-to-date computer equipment. Keep that in mind these next 3-4 years, put money away every paycheck, or every month, so when the time comes to upgrade you are ready to do so.
MateoConLechuga wrote:
https://www.amazon.com/YESWELDER-Powered-Darkening-Welding-Helmet/dp/B07QJ1Y527/ref=mp_s_a_1_16?dchild=1

Mateo, that's a welding mask...

Edit actual advice: get a desktop, you'll be able to get the best cooling solution you can, which is important for intensive workloads.
Mac's are made of a cheap aluminum cover which is quite prone to scratches. Any reasonable computer nowadays consists of a magnesium alloy which is resistant to most wear and tear.

And let's talk about performance. The Macs are severely underpowered when compared to similarly priced hardware. Not only that, but you are advocating work using 1080p, which is way behind the standard 4K and 8K production that many video developers are moving towards.

Buying a Mac is a status symbol. They do not provide ways for you to say, upgrade your SSD or RAM every few years to keep up with the latest hardware. Their cooling solutions are a complete joke. Not only that, but they charge exhuboriant fees for any type of repair or servicing. When something breaks, it is most often required for you to wipe your data and buy a new device.

He is looking for a computer that he can use for programming. Programming requires computers with fast RAM and many cores, of which the Mac line is severely lacking. Regardless, feel free to buy a Mac and Apple will plan its obselence buy making the batteries wear out or having your software run slower. Not only that, they will get rid of 32 bit support to make your ability to build and use older programs impossible.

Don't even get me started on the horrible security practices that plague Macs. Or the stories of new malware that has even made it into the "revolutionary" M1 processor.

Mac's are trash. Look elsewhere.
My two cents, don't buy a computer now. Use what you have for now and save your money for a computer later.

See if the University/college you select has a deal with any manufactures that will give you a discount on the computer that fills your needs then.

Three years is a long time in the computer world. By then Apple might have moved to an MCST Elbrus VLIW processor. Evil or Very Mad
MateoConLechuga wrote:
Not only that, they will get rid of 32 bit support to make your ability to build and use older programs impossible.

They already did. Catalina.
okay, so I ordered a female usb to male mini usb adapter, and I plugged a 32 gb FAT 32 flash drive into the female usb side, and the other side of the adapter into my calculator. my calculator turned on but when I opened Cesium I could't find my drive icon or programs. why is that? thank you in advance!
Edit: I fixed the problem; I didn't have the correct version of Cesium.
randomguy wrote:
okay, so I ordered a female usb to male mini usb adapter, and I plugged a 32 gb FAT 32 flash drive into the female usb side, and the other side of the adapter into my calculator. my calculator turned on but when I opened Cesium I could't find my drive icon or programs. why is that? thank you in advance!


I think you have the wrong thread?
But anyway, you need to enable this in cesium. It's on the second page of the settings, which you can get to by pressing MODE.
Enjoy!
  
Register to Join the Conversation
Have your own thoughts to add to this or any other topic? Want to ask a question, offer a suggestion, share your own programs and projects, upload a file to the file archives, get help with calculator and computer programming, or simply chat with like-minded coders and tech and calculator enthusiasts via the site-wide AJAX SAX widget? Registration for a free Cemetech account only takes a minute.

» Go to Registration page
Page 2 of 2
» All times are GMT - 5 Hours
 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

 

Advertisement