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I have been a collector of Ti graphing calculators Graphing Calculator. I think it would be nice to have a quick and dirty resource by year and architecture. Very Happy
This google drawing is organized into four categories:
Zilog Z80
ARM9
M68k
Misc.

Hope you guys find this useful! Good Idea

https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1HduplXZ26QItJCx42tRvjL8RX_fr88Jw9L2nos6yKkY/edit?usp=sharing
Nice! I like this as a quick resource.

Have you seen this website? http://www.datamath.org/
MateoConLechuga wrote:
It already exists. http://www.datamath.org/


The main difference is that this is by by architecture and it is only texas instruments calculators
Izder456 wrote:
MateoConLechuga wrote:
It already exists. http://www.datamath.org/


The main difference is that this is by by architecture and it is only texas instruments calculators

Click on the side link that says "ALBUM -> Graphing-/Symbolic Calculators"
This is a nice start, I'm assuming you only want to include calculators that went into mass production? If that's the case, then maybe think about adding all the french and chinese models.
I noticed a couple things that are incorrect...
There are some CSE's that were sold with december 2012 as their datecode, and there are some ti-86s from 1996, so maybe push those dates back. The earliest known ti-92 +s are from 1999, not 1998. The ti-73 and the two 73 explorers were z80 based, so those should go up at the top.
Very cool, though im fairly certain the calculators in the misc section run z80 or z80 clone CPU's too.
Everything in the miscellaneous section except the TI-80 is Z80-based and should go in the Z80 category. Edit: And the CE actually uses an ez80, which is distinct from the Z80.

Also “Motorola 6800” should be “Motorola 68000”. Wink
Architecture timeline:


Production timeline (end dates mostly correct):


As far as architecture goes, there's a couple main branches:
  • TI-81 derivatives, with CPU inside the ASIC and three memory-mapped display drivers on a larger LCD support board
  • TI-82 derivatives, with CPU (initially) outside the ASIC and a single port-mapped display driver
  • TI-92 derivatives, based off of the 68k and running TI's AMS OS
  • nspire derivatives, ARM-based and running the nspire OS
  • TI-84 Plus CE, eZ80-based
  • TI-80, running some weird 16-bit CPU

The original TI-81, from introduction in May 1990 to around the second week of April 1993, used the memory-mapped display architecture, then switched to a TI-82 motherboard with a smaller ROM IC and missing link hardware to reduce production cost. The TI-81 1.x firmware was ported to use the new TI-82 hardware and assigned firmware versions V2.0x, as the cost reduction eliminated the old design of the TI-81; it's basically a brand-new calculator with the same name, interface, and miserable screen readability. Nearly every Z80 calculator after the TI-82 used the TI-82's architecture, with notable exception of the TI-85-derived TI-86.

1996 through 2001 were pretty busy for TI. The TI-83 came out in 1996 as an enhanced TI-82, and shortly after in 1997 the TI-86 came out as an enhanced TI-85. TI introduced a Flash-based design of the TI-83 as the TI-73, running its own stripped-down OS; and introduced the TI-89 using a different architecture in the TI-73 housing style. People liked the TI-73 design so much that TI updated the TI-82 and TI-83 to use that new housing in 1999. At that same time, the TI-83 Plus was released; it did not replace the TI-83. The TI-82 and TI-83 were cost-reduced in 2001 to a cheaper-looking design ("Parcus") and only differed in firmware and housing color. Unfortunately, the TI-83 lost its high-contrast FSTN display in the Parcus update, now using the TI-82 Parcus' STN display.

The TI-73 was the first to add and use Flash memory, and introduced a new housing design that eliminated the scratch-prone screen cover and added larger buttons. Design trials were successful enough that TI updated the TI-82 and TI-83 to use that design, and introduced the TI-89 and TI-83 Plus with that housing design. The RF shields on earlier models of those have a TI-73 label on them. The TI-83 Plus is derived from the TI-73, not the other way around. The cosmetic design of the TI-89 is also derived from the TI-73 and was introduced around the same time, but as discussed later, is completely different internally.

The TI-92 slapped a 68000 on a handheld computer-sized calculator when 68000s were still being put in computers, so at the time it was pretty beefy -- and also a completely different architecture from what was being put into the 'regular' graphing calculators. The rest of the 68000-based calculators used this architecture, and the TI-89 is merely a size reduction of the TI-92 with Plus module.

The TI-80 is an oddball and is barely a graphing calculator. The 16-bit processor and part of the ROM are integrated into an ASIC, and not a whole lot is known about the processor.

The TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition still uses the TI-84 Plus Silver Edition architecture, with a new screen attached with new supporting hardware. TI quickly figured out that a 15 MHz Z80 doesn't like to drive a port-mapped high resolution LCD; that model didn't last long. The TI-84 Plus CE that replaced it in 2015 is an entirely new design around a different CPU, a 48 MHz eZ80 with a much larger address space for memory-mapped IO. Additionally, the components used are easier to source than the 1990s-era Z80 core and low-resolution monochrome display.

Credits to Adriweb for some fact-checking
Travis wrote:
Everything in the miscellaneous section except the TI-80 is Z80-based and should go in the Z80 category. Edit: And the CE actually uses an ez80, which is distinct from the Z80.

Also “Motorola 6800” should be “Motorola 68000”. Wink


Travis, what I meant for the misc sec. was that the UI, basic, and asm for those calcs Graphing Calculator are very different than the others, so I put them in their own category
mr womp womp wrote:
This is a nice start, I'm assuming you only want to include calculators that went into mass production? If that's the case, then maybe think about adding all the french and chinese models.
I noticed a couple things that are incorrect...
There are some CSE's that were sold with december 2012 as their datecode, and there are some ti-86s from 1996, so maybe push those dates back. The earliest known ti-92 +s are from 1999, not 1998. The ti-73 and the two 73 explorers were z80 based, so those should go up at the top.


about the ideas of adding the more obscure models seems not necessary bc I am just using the American models, since ya know "'murica!".
CVSoft wrote:
Architecture timeline:


Production timeline (end dates mostly correct):


As far as architecture goes, there's a couple main branches:
  • TI-81 derivatives, with CPU inside the ASIC and three memory-mapped display drivers on a larger LCD support board
  • TI-82 derivatives, with CPU (initially) outside the ASIC and a single port-mapped display driver
  • TI-92 derivatives, based off of the 68k and running TI's AMS OS
  • nspire derivatives, ARM-based and running the nspire OS
  • TI-84 Plus CE, eZ80-based
  • TI-80, running some weird 16-bit CPU

The original TI-81, from introduction in May 1990 to around the second week of April 1993, used the memory-mapped display architecture, then switched to a TI-82 motherboard with a smaller ROM IC and missing link hardware to reduce production cost. The TI-81 1.x firmware was ported to use the new TI-82 hardware and assigned firmware versions V2.0x, as the cost reduction eliminated the old design of the TI-81; it's basically a brand-new calculator with the same name, interface, and miserable screen readability. Nearly every Z80 calculator after the TI-82 used the TI-82's architecture, with notable exception of the TI-85-derived TI-86.

1996 through 2001 were pretty busy for TI. The TI-83 came out in 1996 as an enhanced TI-82, and shortly after in 1997 the TI-86 came out as an enhanced TI-85. TI introduced a Flash-based design of the TI-83 as the TI-73, running its own stripped-down OS; and introduced the TI-89 using a different architecture in the TI-73 housing style. People liked the TI-73 design so much that TI updated the TI-82 and TI-83 to use that new housing in 1999. At that same time, the TI-83 Plus was released; it did not replace the TI-83. The TI-82 and TI-83 were cost-reduced in 2001 to a cheaper-looking design ("Parcus") and only differed in firmware and housing color. Unfortunately, the TI-83 lost its high-contrast FSTN display in the Parcus update, now using the TI-82 Parcus' STN display.

The TI-73 was the first to add and use Flash memory, and introduced a new housing design that eliminated the scratch-prone screen cover and added larger buttons. Design trials were successful enough that TI updated the TI-82 and TI-83 to use that design, and introduced the TI-89 and TI-83 Plus with that housing design. The RF shields on earlier models of those have a TI-73 label on them. The TI-83 Plus is derived from the TI-73, not the other way around. The cosmetic design of the TI-89 is also derived from the TI-73 and was introduced around the same time, but as discussed later, is completely different internally.

The TI-92 slapped a 68000 on a handheld computer-sized calculator when 68000s were still being put in computers, so at the time it was pretty beefy -- and also a completely different architecture from what was being put into the 'regular' graphing calculators. The rest of the 68000-based calculators used this architecture, and the TI-89 is merely a size reduction of the TI-92 with Plus module.

The TI-80 is an oddball and is barely a graphing calculator. The 16-bit processor and part of the ROM are integrated into an ASIC, and not a whole lot is known about the processor.

The TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition still uses the TI-84 Plus Silver Edition architecture, with a new screen attached with new supporting hardware. TI quickly figured out that a 15 MHz Z80 doesn't like to drive a port-mapped high resolution LCD; that model didn't last long. The TI-84 Plus CE that replaced it in 2015 is an entirely new design around a different CPU, a 48 MHz eZ80 with a much larger address space for memory-mapped IO. Additionally, the components used are easier to source than the 1990s-era Z80 core and low-resolution monochrome display.

Credits to Adriweb for some fact-checking


thanks for the info but to keep things simple keeping them in three categorys of majority and one of minority may be more understandable. would you mind if i give you credit for some edits?
Izder456 wrote:
Travis, what I meant for the misc sec. was that the UI, basic, and asm for those calcs Graphing Calculator are very different than the others, so I put them in their own category


Well, your first post had said they were listed by architecture, and that was what your choice of category labels implied. After all, “Z80” and “68K” are names of processors, not names of UI variants. (Also, I'd argue that both ASM and BASIC programming of the 81/82/85/86 are more similar to the calcs you have in the “(e)Z80” category than they are different. And ASM for 84+/84+CSE is very different than that of the 84+CE, yet those are in the same category. And the 83+'s UI is like that of the 81/82, yet those are in different categories. Etc. So grouping them by system architecture makes more sense to me than trying to categorize them by arbitrary distinctions in the ROM software.)
Izder456 wrote:
about the ideas of adding the more obscure models seems not necessary bc I am just using the American models, since ya know "'murica!".

So non-american calculators are now "obscure", good to know.
mr womp womp wrote:
Izder456 wrote:
about the ideas of adding the more obscure models seems not necessary bc I am just using the American models, since ya know "'murica!".

So non-american calculators are now "obscure", good to know.

Them Canadians are going obscure.
Izder456 wrote:
would you mind if i give you credit for some edits?

Sure, go ahead.

Travis wrote:
the 83+'s UI is like that of the 81/82, yet those are in different categories

If there's grouping by user interface, should we throw the TI-30XS MultiView and derivatives into the TI-82 section? >.>
CVSoft wrote:
Izder456 wrote:
would you mind if i give you credit for some edits?

Sure, go ahead.

Travis wrote:
the 83+'s UI is like that of the 81/82, yet those are in different categories

If there's grouping by user interface, should we throw the TI-30XS MultiView and derivatives into the TI-82 section? >.>

Rolling Eyes
A few days ago, TI-Planet and Planete-Casio member "Lephe" resumed the 2013 work by Persalteas to create such a timeline, updating and improving upon it.
I believe this will add further information to this topic, so here you can see what's been done, even though it's not sorted the same way: https://tiplanet.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=61&t=22201
Adriweb wrote:
A few days ago, TI-Planet and Planete-Casio member "Lephe" resumed the 2013 work by Persalteas to create such a timeline, updating and improving upon it.
I believe this will add further information to this topic, so here you can see what's been done, even though it's not sorted the same way: https://tiplanet.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=61&t=22201

Where are my TI-80s Evil or Very Mad
  
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