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Ok I kind of want to use this as a way to ask derpy questions about science and other things. Just random things that pop into my mind.

Question:
Is our vision pixel or vector based or something else?
Are these two things not applicable? If so then what is?
If you could zoom up into your own vision, would it be pixelated or not?
From a purely structural perspective, the eye's photoreceptors act like pixels of a camera's sensor. If you took a sufficiently tiny slice of retina, it would act like a single pixel if you were to examine the corresponding nerve.

The brain utilizes a ton of tricks to generate what you percieve as a single image. Among other things, the eyes tend to rapidly scan scenes without conscious effort. Much of what you see is the product of the brain reconstructing images from short-term memory- the eyes' resolution is much lower than you might think.

Quote:
If you could zoom up into your own vision, would it be pixelated or not?
Probably not. As above, the brain is very good at messing with images to make them seem normal. If you were to somehow muck with the optic nerve to interrupt signals from all but a very small area of photoreceptors, you'd probably end up with a very dim and blurry image.
Well. This is going to get messy.

Our vision is neither, and Tari does a good job explaining what our vision is. Now Pixel & Vector are inherently a digital term when it comes to images. Pixel is, well, pixel based while vector is math based. You can only zoom into a pixel image so many times until it pixelates, which is 100%, but with vector you can zoom in to 1600% and still have very clear images because all the shapes and points are mathematical. I'm sure there's a better definition and someone will find something to nitpick over, but that's the gist.
Tari wrote:
From a purely structural perspective, the eye's photoreceptors act like pixels of a camera's sensor. If you took a sufficiently tiny slice of retina, it would act like a single pixel if you were to examine the corresponding nerve.

The brain utilizes a ton of tricks to generate what you percieve as a single image. Among other things, the eyes tend to rapidly scan scenes without conscious effort. Much of what you see is the product of the brain reconstructing images from short-term memory- the eyes' resolution is much lower than you might think.

Quote:
If you could zoom up into your own vision, would it be pixelated or not?
Probably not. As above, the brain is very good at messing with images to make them seem normal. If you were to somehow muck with the optic nerve to interrupt signals from all but a very small area of photoreceptors, you'd probably end up with a very dim and blurry image.

Thanks Tari, I've wanted to know the answer to that question for a while
comicIDIOT wrote:
Well. This is going to get messy.

Our vision is neither, and Tari does a good job explaining what our vision is. Now Pixel & Vector are inherently a digital term when it comes to images. Pixel is, well, pixel based while vector is math based. You can only zoom into a pixel image so many times until it pixelates, which is 100%, but with vector you can zoom in to 1600% and still have very clear images because all the shapes and points are mathematical. I'm sure there's a better definition and someone will find something to nitpick over, but that's the gist.

Basically, if you zoomed up in your vision somehow, would it be pixelated, clear, or blurry, Tari already answered that Smile
I was just telling the difference between Pixel & Vector before I got to human vision, which is what Tari posted so I didn't continue.

I sadly don't have any questions to keep this thread going at the moment Sad
I guess I'll ask another one?

Question:
Why is it that whenever there is a carpet over a wooden floor for a long period of time and the carpet is removed, the floor underneath is slippery like an ice rink
Question:
So the tastiness of food is actually developed when you are young, so as a child, depending on what your mother eats, your taste in food develops around that. So the question is, is it possible to eat almost everything so the child will enjoy eating everything?
Or will there always be something the child does not enjoy?
Another question.
What would be the most accurate reproduction of the POV of a person opening their eyes slowly? I noticed that sometimes in cutscenes, there is an almond shaped thing. I feel like that is very inaccurate. :-/
APotato wrote:
Another question.
What would be the most accurate reproduction of the POV of a person opening their eyes slowly? I noticed that sometimes in cutscenes, there is an almond shaped thing. I feel like that is very inaccurate. :-/

This seems to be to be somewhat accurate, if I close my eyes and open them very slowly, I can see that "almond" type shape, but that's if my eyes follow the top eyelid as it moves up. If I try to keep my eyes facing directly straight (facing perpendicular from my face), then it's almost like a slightly curved line opening upwards.

I suck at describing such things hah Razz
Interesting... Thats a good description though, I would try doing it myself but my sister would begin to question my actions.
APotato wrote:
Question:
So the tastiness of food is actually developed when you are young, so as a child,
Citation needed.

I'd buy that foods one eats as a small child are generally taken to be "good", but that's probably about as far as any such connection goes.

APotato wrote:
Why is it that whenever there is a carpet over a wooden floor for a long period of time and the carpet is removed, the floor underneath is slippery like an ice rink
Sounds dubious. Depending on the pad or backing material of the carpet there might be some kind of leaching effect going on. Especially with petrochemical backings, I could see some kind of polishing effect going on with volatile components leaching out of the backing material.
APotato wrote:
Question:
So the tastiness of food is actually developed when you are young, so as a child, depending on what your mother eats, your taste in food develops around that.


Many babies do not like the taste of some baby food, so I am not sure that is true...

Also, my mother liked beets and ate them before I was born, but I do not like them at all and neither do my siblings.
  
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